Tourism NT & Jackson Groves
Northern Territory
Uluru & SurroundsOne of the true icons of Austalia, Uluru is the spiritual heart of the country and the traditional land of the Aṉangu People. Take your time, as you explore this sacred region.
Uluru/Ayers Rock is Australia's most recognisable natural icon. Standing 348 metres high, the monolith has a great cultural significance for the traditional Aboriginal owners, the Anangu people. Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is located 440 kilometres by road south-west of Alice Springs and encompasses both Uluru/Ayers Rock and the 36 domes of Kata Tjuta/The Olgas, and both dating back hundreds of millions of years. Visitors to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park can also browse through the informative and award-winning Uluru-Kata Tjuta Cultural Centre. When exploring the base of Uluru/Ayers Rock, there are several excellent interpretative walks, including the Uluru Base Walk and the Kuniya Walk. The Valley of the Winds Walk winds through the domes of Kata Tjuta and includes spectacular lookout points. These walks can be done independently or as part of a tour. Visitors stay at Ayers Rock Resort, which is the focal point for the township of Yulara. Atila / Mt Conner, located 100 kilometres east of Uluru, is a spectacular mesa that is often mistaken for Uluru. It is three times as large as Uluru and can be visited on tours from Curtin Springs Station. The Uluru-Kata Tjuta region (sometimes referred to as the Peterman Region) also includes the stunning Kings Canyon within Watarrka National Park. Kings Canyon lies 310 kilometres west of Alice Springs. The canyon's 300-metre high sandstone walls are breathtaking, and the surrounding area is home to diverse flora and fauna. Travellers can hike to the canyon rim, follow a walking trail through the scenic desert surrounds, or stroll along the boulder-strewn valley floor. The 22 kilometre Giles Track begins at Kathleen Springs and ends at Kings Canyon, Watarrka National Park.
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Take in the majesty of Kings Canyon
Kings Canyon, Watarrka National Park, is located 450 kilometres south-west of Alice Springs in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta region of the Northern Territory. The Park encompasses the western end of the George Gill Range and is home to a variety of unique native flora and fauna, including over 600 different plant species. Commercial accommodation can be found within the Park at the Kings Canyon Resort and Kings Creek Station. The area has also been home to Luritja Aboriginal people for the last 20,000 years. The word Watarrka refers to the umbrella bush that proliferates in this amazing landscape. Combined with an eerie collection of weathered rock formations known as the Lost City and a permanent waterhole veiled by palms and ferns known as the Garden of Eden, a visit to the incredible Kings Canyon is full of surprises. Kings Canyon has several accommodation options from campsites to luxury hotel units as well as a restaurant, cafe, bar, souvenir shop and fuel. The ‘Canyon Rim Walk’ requires a reasonable level of fitness as the initial ascent to the top can be demanding. The walk is approximately six kilometres so allow at least three hours, wear sturdy footwear, appropriate clothing and carry at least one litre of water per person. The canyon can also be viewed via scenic helicopter flight out of the resort or Kings Creek Station.
Marvel at the Field of Light Tours
The largest Field of Light installation to date, with more than 50,000 stems crowned with frosted-glass spheres will bloom. There are several ways to experience the Field of Light art installation from the Field of Light entry pass to A Night at Field of Light by Heli. It is an experience not to be missed.
Learn from a local guide at Kata Tjuta
The Uluru-Kata Tjuta Cultural Centre is a great starting point for visitors to the park. The centre offers information about activities and the park as well as an introduction into Anangu culture. Because of the deep spiritual nature of the area and what is contained within the Cultural Centre, please do not photograph or video inside the building or precinct. This is to respect the wishes of the traditional owners, and protect Anangu's cultural and intellectual property. This award-winning Cultural Centre, a stunning example of contemporary Australian architecture. Dynamic displays, video and artwork explain this world heritage landscape from the perspective of the traditional owners, Anangu. Learn about Tjukurpa, creation stories and laws, which explain the spiritual meanings of the surrounding landscapes. To enjoy the Uluru-Kata Tjuta Cultural Centre you must enter Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. A park entry fee of AUD25.00 for a 3-day pass applies, child (5-15years) is AUD12.50 and children 4 years and under are free. Annual Adult passes are available for AUD32.50 and annual children passes are AUD15.00.
Explore Watarrka National Park
Watarrka National Park encloses Kings Canyon, with its 300-metre high sandstone walls, walking trails, lush forests and permanent waterholes. The sheer red rock face of the canyon soars above dense forests of palms, ferns and cycads, sheltering them from the harsh desert, and providing refuge for many native animals. The Park has been home to the Luritja people for more than 20,000 years, and its flora, fauna and rock formations are best seen on foot. Try the gentle shady Kings Creek Walk trail one kilometre along the valley floor. Get up early to see the sunrise and walk the six kilometres around the Canyon rim to take in magnificent views across the desert or into the lush valley below. The 2.6 kilometre walk to Kathleen Springs takes you to historical sites and a spring-fed water hole. Fit and experienced hikers will love the Giles Track, a 22 kilometre walk between Kings Canyon and Kathleen Springs. The Park can be reached from Uluru in around four hours by taking the Lasseter Highway and Luritja Road. Those with a four-wheel drive can then take the unsealed Mereenie Loop on to Alice Springs.
Take in Uluru by air
Ayers Rock Helicopters is one of central Australia’s most experienced and professional helicopter tour operators. The team believes that a helicopter flight over Central Australia is a great trip, however, it is the extra detail they pay to their customers that makes flying with us an unforgettable experience. A helicopter is the perfect mode of transport to explore the rugged and remote Central Australian landscape, from a 15 minute Rock Blasting tour to an all-day helicopter Safari, it will be an experience of a lifetime.
Watch the Desert awaken
Desert Awakenings offers a five-hour tour away from the crowds, to a secluded dune to watch the sunrise over Uluru-Kata Tjuta, in the company of an expert guide and a small group. View rock paintings and some of the stories from the creation period as told by the Anangu people. Desert Awakening is a much sought after experience that delivers insight into the ancient landscape, ecology, culture, heritage, and history of what is now regarded as Australia’s spiritual heartland.
Be mesmerized by the outback stars
Your resident astronomer will guide you through the evolution of the Universe. Explore the night sky with the use of telescopes, binoculars and iPads. Learn how stars are formed, why they produce light, the lifecycle of a star, the theory of "the Big Bang" and much more. Enhance your knowledge of astronomy.
Enjoy Kings Creek Station
Situated at the foot of the beautiful George Gill Range, just 35 kilometres from Kings Canyon, Kings Creek Station is a truly unique 2,000 square kilometre slice of the real Australian outback. Owned and operated by locals, brimming with true outback hospitality, Kings Creek Station is where an outback adventure begins. Travellers can set up camp in the tranquil campground or stay in a safari cabin set amongst the natural bush, try a famous Kings Creek camel burger, relax by the pool, take a stroll to the George Gill lookout for magnificent views of the range and enjoy this genuine cattle and camel station. Their camels are not just good looking they are friendly and reliable because they take good care of them. The camel train is led by their experienced guide who is happy to answer your questions and take your photograph. The camels easy gait and comfortable, individually designed saddles ensure a safe and pleasant ride. Kings Creek Station uses a loading platform for your safety and convenience and to reduce strain on the camel joints. Helmets are provided for your added safety. Four tours are available, starting from a quick five-minute ride to an hour-long ride.
Skydive Uluru
Skydive at Uluru! Tandem skydives with Skydive Uluru (Ayers Rock). Join us for a tandem skydive with views of Uluru (Ayers Rock), Kata-Tjuta (the Olgas), Lake Amadeus and Mt. Connor. This tour operates daily at Ayers Rock Resort. An Australian Parachute Federation qualified instructor will take you for a once in a lifetime experience. Skydiving at Uluru (Ayers Rock) will make your visit to the spiritual heart of Australia truly unforgettable. There is no better way to view Uluru from the air.
Dine beneath the stars at Uluru
Your Sounds of Silence experience begins with canapes and chilled sparkling wine served on a viewing platform overlooking the Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park. As the sun sets and darkness falls to the sound of a didgeridoo, join your table of fellow travellers for an unforgettable dining experience and an introduction to Aboriginal culture with a traditional dance performance under the outback sky. Our attentive staff will keep your glass full with a quality selection of Australian wine and beers while first course is served. As the night sky twinkles to life, help yourself to a bush tucker inspired buffet that incorporates native bush ingredients such as crocodile, kangaroo, barramundi and quandong. After dinner, settle back and listen to our resident star talker decode the southern night sky. Locate the Southern Cross, the signs of the zodiac, the Milky Way, as well as planets and galaxies that are visible due to the exceptional clarity of the atmosphere. After dinner, enjoy dessert with a glass of port, tea or coffee.
Take a camel ride around Uluru
Award-winning Uluru Camel Tours is an owner-operated tour business based in the Red Centre of Australia showcasing 25 years of passion of all things camel! They offer a camel experience that can't be beaten anywhere in Australia, with the world heritage area of Uluru and Kata Tjuta as our stunning backdrop. The farm is situated at Voyages Ayers Rock Resort and is open all year round for visitors to come and have a short ride and explore our camel museum and saddlery. It is home to 60 friendly working camels who visitors fall in love with! Guests leave with lifelong memories of Uluru and the Outback. If you are looking for the ultimate way to experience this beautiful desert region that no one else can offer visit Uluru Camel Tours when you're in the Red Centre. School groups are welcome and can customise excursions to align with the curriculum or their current studies.
Explore Uluru by Segway
Uluru Segway Tours offer a Segway tour that can’t be beaten anywhere in Australia. Enjoy stunning views of Uluru as you join our knowledgeable guides and tour the full base of Uluru on a Segway. Get up close and personal with the picturesque landscape and immerse yourself in the history and culture of Uluru and the region. Uluru Segway Tours have a variety of tours. Including Sunrise and Sunset tours and options throughout the day. Tours have the option to be picked up from Ayers Rock Resort or self-drive to our Segway site base. All tours are small group tours, with no more than 12 participants per guide. Segway tours are an exceptional way to explore the full base of Uluru without having to walk in the heat and are fun and informative. Don’t miss out. Segway Uluru and see it all!
Immerse yourself in the beauty of the Uluru/Kata Tjuta Region
Uluru/Ayers Rock is one of the most recognised symbols of Australia. The monolith stands 348 metres high and has a great cultural significance for the traditional Aboriginal owners, the Anangu people. Located 440 kilometres to the west of Alice Springs by road, Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park contains Uluru/Ayers Rock and the impressive 36 domes of Kata Tjuta/The Olgas. These massive geological formations date back over 500 million years and are visited by thousands of travellers each year. A range of accommodation from camp sites to luxury is available at Yulara, a small township purpose built to service park visitors. Yulara contains Ayers Rock Resort, made up of a range of properties to suit most budgets, a shopping centre and an airport with daily connections to several other Australian destinations.
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We acknowledge the traditional owners of the country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, sea and community.We pay our respect to them and their cultures and to the elders past and present.