Garry Moore
Victoria
Wilsons Promontory National Park A world-class wilderness experience that calls nature lovers from all over the world. This much-loved national park offers a spectacular landscape where granite mountains meet sandy beaches, and open bushland merges with dense rainforest.
Fondly known as ‘The Prom’, Wilsons Promontory is one of Victoria’s best-loved national parks. Situated at the southernmost tip of mainland Australia, you will find spectacular scenery of granite mountains, native forests, rainforest, sweeping beaches and coastlines. From sun‐drenched summer beaches to secluded winter walks among rainforest, the Prom has something for everyone. Visitors can camp, caravan or stay in huts, cabins, wilderness retreats or lodges at Tidal River where there is a general store and take-away food shop. Enjoy short walks along Norman Beach, Picnic Bay or Squeaky Beach and see a variety of wildlife including kangaroos, wombats and emus. As with everywhere in Australia, please keep a safe distance from the animals and do not feed them. Before you go: Conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website.
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Wilsons Promontory Marine National Park
Wilsons Promontory Marine National Park is a diver's paradise, featuring spectacular underwater scenery. Granite cliffs plunge below the surface and deep reefs are covered in sponges. Its small islands are home to colonies of penguins, seabirds and seals. Wilsons Promontory Marine National Park is Victoria's largest Marine Protected Area. It extends along 17 kilometres of mainland coastline and is located around the southern tip of Wilsons Promontory. The coastline here is stunning, with beautiful sandy beaches, granite mountains and cliffs with a backdrop of rugged picturesque offshore islands. Divers will experience fascinating sponge gardens which consist of a technicoloured assemblage of sponges, sea tulips, sea whips, lace corals and seafans. Octopus emerge at night whilst sharks and rays roam the sandy areas. The offshore islands support many colonies of fur seals and oceanic birds such as Little Penguins, Fairy Prions, Silver Gulls and Pacific Gulls. Conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.
Great Prom Walk
Enjoy the best of Victoria’s most loved national park on a world-class walk. Distance: 35.5 to 52.8 kilometres. Walk: Three to four days return. Grade: Level 4 - bushwalking experience and a good level of fitness required. Tracks may be long, rough and very steep. Directional signage may be limited. Start and finish Telegraph Saddle Car Park. Permits/bookings are required for an overnight hike. This circuit takes in the best of everything at Victoria's most loved national park, Wilsons Promontory. There are two options depending on your time and energy, departing and returning to Telegraph Saddle Car Park. Option One: Distance 35.5 kilometres Leave the car park with a steady climb to Windy Saddle and then downhill through a beautiful ferny glade and forest to Sealers Cove. Enjoy the great views along the coast between Sealers and Refuge Cove then climb steeply over Kersops Peak to Little Waterloo Bay. From there, follow the shoreline over sand dunes and swamps to Telegraph Track, where a steady climb takes you back up to the car park. Option Two: Distance: 52.8 kilometres Take Option One as far as Little Waterloo Bay and then follow the coastal track to the lighthouse. After leaving the lighthouse, take Telegraph Track back through the Prom's undulating interior to the car park.
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